Hyper-V

Hyper-V formerly known as Windows Server Virtualization, is a native hypervisor; it can create virtual machines on x86-64 systems.Starting with Windows 8, Hyper-V supersedes Windows Virtual PC as the hardware virtualization component of the client editions of Windows NT.

A host server running Hyper-V could be accessed remotely by multiple guest computers. Each guest computer could perform as if they are using the host server directly. Users on the guest computers could run applications in the host server remotely, even though that application is not available on the guest computer.

A beta version of Hyper-V was shipped with certain x86-64 editions of Windows Server 2008, and a finalized version (delivered through Windows Update) was released on June 26, 2008. Hyper-V has since been released in a free stand-alone version, and has been upgraded to Release 2 (R2) status. It was updated in Windows Server 2012.

Microsoft Hyper-V Server

The stand-alone Hyper-V Server variant does not require an existing installation of Windows Server 2008 nor Windows Server 2008 R2. The standalone installation is called Microsoft Hyper-V Server for the non-R2 version and Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2008 R2. Microsoft Hyper-V server is built with components of Windows and has a Windows Server Core user experience. None of the other roles of Windows Server are available in Microsoft Hyper-V Server. This version supports up to 64 VMs per system. System requirements of Microsoft Hyper-V server are the same for supported guest operating systems and processor, but differ in the following:

RAM: Minimum: 1 GB RAM; Recommended: 2 GB RAM or greater; Maximum 1 TB.

Available disk space: Minimum: 8 GB; Recommended: 20 GB or greater.